“a highly accomplished and imaginative improviser…” Jazzwise


"He possesses a dazzling and fluent technique, and a comprehensive grasp of the intricacies of jazz harmony which is intelligently and imaginatively applied, wh ether on standards or on his own compositions." The Scotsman


“Compelling, startling music, unlike anything else on the current jazz scene in Scotland.” London Jazz News 


…up there alongside the talented generation of British jazz pianists who have made their mark during the past two decades, including Andrew McCormack, Gwilym Simcock, Ivo Neame, and Richard Harrold of Trio HLK.   Gramophone

Paul Harrison

Is a Scotland based musician who plays piano, organ and keyboards, and is also a composer and producer too.  A team player, but also at home performing solo, he brings creativity and excitement to every situation.  He has drawn praise for the sensitivity of his improvising, the originality of his composing, the breadth of his inspiration and the diversity of the music he plays and records. He has performed and recorded with many Scottish, British, and International artists not only in jazz but in world music, folk and other genres.

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LIVE REVIEW 

UP LATE WITH DOMO BRANCH

Edinburgh International Festival 2023


edinburghmusicreview.com


“Having met stellar Scottish jazz conversationalists Paul Harrison (piano) and Andrew Robb (bass) but an hour beforehand, the three of them seamlessly conjured up an impressionistic sea of sound based on a set of standards. Here was Domo Branch and his first-rate collaborators paying tribute to the past while dwelling in the present and pointing to the future: jazz as it was meant to be. "

ALBUM REVIEW

SUGARWORK

Jazz Journal, November 2018


“This eponymously titled debut album comes from a Scottish band led by Paul Harrison, who wrote seven of the 10 tunes presented here and produced and mixed the album. The essence of the music owed much to Harrison’s proclivity for electronica. Amonst the angularity and staccato electronics of say, The Stairs, there are moments of pastoral serenity as on Short Story Long. Occasionally, as in The End One Day, both elements combine. Apparently, Harrison’s desire was “to create a band that uses harmony, improvisation and loud electronic instruments without straying into jazz fusion.” Judging by this recording, he’s achieved his ambition.”

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